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SCHOLARS

 

Deborah Chen

Chen

Deborah Chen graduated with a B.S. summa cum laude from the College of William & Mary in 2010 with a double-major in neuroscience and psychology. She was a CES intern from the summer of 2008 through the summer of 2009, assisting with “Legal Trends in Bioethics” and research for the organ shortage project. She became a CES scholar in early 2011 and is helping to co-author the Center’s forthcoming book documenting the Iranian organ procurement system.

Dr. Bahar Bastani

Dr. Bastani has been with the Center since the fall of 2008. He is co-author with Sigrid Fry-Revere of a forthcoming book documenting the results of their filed research on the Iranian organ procurement system and an investigator on a proposed grant to study U.S. attitudes towards compensated kidney donation.

Dr Bastani is a Professor of Medicine – Nephrology at Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, Missouri. He completed his Medical school and residency training in Internal Medicine at Shiraz University, Iran in 1980. He was head of the Health Dept. in Jahrom City during 1980-1982, served in Bandar Abbas during 1983-4, and served as a faculty in Medicine at Tehran University in early 1984.

He immigrated to USA in 1984, did 2 years of fellowship in Nephrology at Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville; 2 years of Senior and Chief Residency in Internal Medicine at Mount Sinai Hosp.-Univ. of Wisconsin; and 3 years of Research Fellowship at Washington Univ., Saint Louis MO, (1988 to 1991). He has published some 180 scientific medical manuscripts and book chapters.

Dr Bastani is in the board of directors of “Iranian-American Cultural Society of Mid-West” and “Shia Islamic Educational Center in Saint Louis”. He is also Vice President of “the Islamic Medical Association of North America – Saint Louis branch”.

Dr Bastani was president of Faculty Assembly of Saint Louis University-School of Medicine from 2005 to 2008, and American Association of University Professors – Saint Louis University Chapter.

Dr. Bastani has been with the Center since the fall of 2008. He is co-author with Sigrid Fry-Revere of a forthcoming book documenting the results of their field research on the Iranian organ procurement system and an investigator on a proposed grant to study U.S. attitudes towards compensated kidney donation.

Dr Bastani is a Professor of Medicine – Nephrology at Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, Missouri. He completed his Medical school and residency training in Internal Medicine at Shiraz University, Iran in 1980. He was head of the Health Dept. in Jahrom City during 1980-1982, served in Bandar Abbas during 1983-4, and served as a faculty in Medicine at Tehran University in early 1984.

He immigrated to USA in 1984, did 2 years of fellowship in Nephrology at Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville; 2 years of Senior and Chief Residency in Internal Medicine at Mount Sinai Hosp.-Univ. of Wisconsin; and 3 years of Research Fellowship at Washington Univ., Saint Louis MO, (1988 to 1991). He has published some 180 scientific medical manuscripts and book chapters.

Dr Bastani is in the board of directors of “Iranian-American Cultural Society of Mid-West” and “Shia Islamic Educational Center in Saint Louis”. He is also Vice President of “the Islamic Medical Association of North America – Saint Louis branch”.

Dr Bastani was president of Faculty Assembly of Saint Louis University-School of Medicine from 2005 to 2008, and American Association of University Professors – Saint Louis University Chapter.

Kara Forest

Dr Forest is a board-certified psychiatrist who has been a scholar with the Center since 2010.  She wrote the Center’s Fact Sheet on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury and will be involved in investigating veterans’ issues.  Dr Forest graduated summa cum laude from Washington University in St Louis in 1986 and then attended medical school at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas from 1986-1990.  After completing her residency in adult psychiatry at Duke University Medical Center, Dr Forest worked as a psychiatrist at Spring Grove Hospital Center and served as an assistant professor of psychiatry at University of Maryland until 1999.  She left the work force in order to care for her young children and then returned to clinical practice from 2007-2010 as a psychiatrist with the VA Hospital, where she developed her current interest in veteran’s issues.

 

Lisa Leicht

lisa lightLisa Leicht joined the Center in 2012. She is the editor of the report: “Making End-of-Life Healthcare Decisions Count: An Interactive Guide,” by Sigrid Fry-Revere, JD, Ph.D. Before to coming to CES, Ms. Leicht worked at the Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute (PKSOI) as a legal researcher, writer, and project manager. Ms. Leicht earned a BA in History from Shippensburg University in 1987, an MA in Medieval Legal History from The Pennsylvania State University in 1991, and a JD from Penn State University’s Dickinson School of Law in 2009. For 25 years prior to her employment as a researcher, writer, and editor, Ms. Leicht was a professional violinist near Harrisburg, PA, where she lives with her husband, Robert, and their three cats, Wppsi, Cyaneyed, and Lexus.

Huan Zhu

huan zhu

Huan Zhu was born and raised in the Southern portion of China.  At the age of 18, she shifted to Shanghai where she began to study Law at the East China University of Political Science and Law (ECUPL).  There she focused on international law with an enfasis on economic law.  While at the ECUPL, Huan completed her Bachelor in Laws along with a Master of Laws.  During her graduate work at the ECUPL, Huan was selected as an exchange student to study in Belgium at Ghent University where she focused her studies on European and Comparative Law and subsequently received an LLM degree for her efforts.  In the Fall of 2008, Huan entered the Doctor of Juridical Science (S.J.D.) program at the University of Kansas School of Law where she completed her program in the Spring of 2011 with a dissertation on patent-eligibility of human embryonic stem cells.  She joined the Center for Ethical Solutions in 2012, and have contributed to Legal Trends in Bioethics project, End-of-life research project, Organ Procurement Around the World report, and other legal issues. 


Thomas Fitzpatrick

Thomas is a third year law student at the Seattle University School of Law. He obtained his B.S. in Chemistry with a focus in Biochemistry from the  Georgia Institute of Technology. He has worked in the healthcare field, including as research coordinator for the Department of Psychiatry and Health Behavior at the Medical College of Georgia. After earning his JD, Thomas plans to focus on healthcare law and bioethics.

PAST SCHOLARS

Suzanne Zychowicz

Suzanne Zychowicz is a consulting scholar researching minority health disparities and concerns regarding live kidney donation and transplantation. She has been instrumental and continues to assist Sigrid Fry-Revere with grant writing and seeking project funding opportunities for the Center. Suzanne joined the Center in the spring of 2009 after earning her Masters of Science in Nursing from California State University, San Bernardino; where her graduate research experience as a RIMI (Research Infrastructure for Minority Serving Institutions) Health Scholar and community health program emphasis included comprehensive examination of health disparities among minority populations.  In addition to her clinical practice Suzanne has enjoyed serving her community as a member of the city of Temecula’s Medical Facility Task Force, as a Community Review Team member and Loaned Executive with the United Way of the Inland Valleys, as Co-Chair of the Health and Safety Committee and volunteer positions for a local charter school, and in leadership for community public advocacy. Suzanne and her husband, Ohio natives, now reside in Temecula, CA where they have been raising their three daughters and son.

 

Mohammad Ali Naquvi

Mohammad Ali Naquvi graduated from Albany Law School in 2010 with a joint JD/MS degree in Health Law and Bioethics in conjunction with Albany Medical College.  His thesis was entitled “Intercultural Perspectives on Stem Cell Patentability”.  As President of the Health Law Society at ALS, he established an annual Health Law Week in the midst of the healthcare debates around the country.  He was also an intern in the Health Law Clinic at the ALS Law Clinic & Justice Center filing cases in the United States District Court for the Northern District of New York on behalf of patients who had been denied disability benefits by the Social Security Administration.  As a summer associate in the legal division at Pfizer, Ali worked with attorneys in various in-house legal practice areas including patent prosecution, regulatory compliance, and in the unit of regenerative medicine exploring the legal and regulatory hurdles of developing stem cell-based therapies.

Previously, Ali worked as a research assistant for two years in the lab of world-renowned neurobiologist Dr. Tom Jessell at the Center for Neurobiology & Behavior at Columbia University’s College of Physicians & Surgeons in New York City.  Following that, he earned a Master of Science degree in Biology with cum laude distinction from Rutgers University-Newark.  He then worked as a freelance pharmaceutical medical writer and editor for various marketing agencies helping to launch newly approved drugs for many clients including Bristol-Myers Squibb, Pfizer, and Novartis.  Specifically, he wrote and edited training materials for various audiences and worked with brand managers, marketing professionals, physicians, attorneys, and regulatory experts to ensure that all pieces were scientifically accurate, legally sound and FDA compliant.

Ali has worked with CES since October, 2010 and was named Editor of Legal Trends in February, 2011.  His current interests lie at the intersection of science, law, religion, and bioethics, specifically in regards to the debates surrounding the origin of life, viability, abortion and stem cell patenting.

Matthew Ray

Matthew Ray is a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Candidate, expected to graduate from the Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine with the class of 2014.  He graduated from the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey in 2008 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology with a concentration in chemistry, as well as a Bachelor of Arts degree in Philosophy and Religion.  He completed a Master of Arts degree in Bioethics from the New York University in the Winter of 2010.  Matthew’s interests include pediatric orthopedic surgery, the role quality assessments play in our moral judgment and the value of life, and the means by which healthcare resources are allocated among people and groups.  He began interning with the CES in Fall of 2009, and was promoted to Scholar in August 2010.  He co-authored “Death: A New Legal Perspective” (2010) with Sigrid Fry-Revere and Thomas Reher, has contributed to the Center’s website, and is currently assisting with the final compilation of the Organ Procurement Around the World report.

 

Thomas Reher

Thomas Reher is a Doctor of Medicine candidate, class of 2014 at Indiana University School of Medicine. In 2007, he received a Bachelors of Arts in Spanish and a Bachelors of Science in Biology from Concordia University–Wisconsin. In 2010 he completed a Master of Arts in Bioethics and Health Policy from Loyola University in Chicago. He began interning with CES since the Fall of 2009 and was promoted to scholar in August of 2010. He co-authored Death: A New Legal Perspective (2010) with Sigrid Fry-Revere and Matthew Ray, has contributed to Legal Trends in Bioethics (2010) as well as Making End-of-Life Healthcare Decisions Count (awaiting publication).

Khemaies Meskini

Khemaies Meskini is the editor and project coordinator of the Center’s “Organ Procurement Around the World” report. He has joined the Center in November 2009. The project is compiling the first comparative report on organ procurement statistics and policies around the world. The organ shortage is an international phenomenon which this report strives to put into perspective by creating, for the first time, a report that allows an overview and comparison of dozens of countries.  Mr. Meskini is fluent in Arabic, French and English. After joining the Center as a foreign language intern, he was promoted to a research scholar. He received a master’s degree in Civil Law from the Law School University of Sousse, Tunisia. He is also the recipient of a Master of Laws (LL.M.) in Intellectual Property, Commerce and Technology from Franklin Pierce Law Center, Concord, New Hampshire. He is currently working as a linguist with AECOM Inc.

 

Alison Mathey

Alison Mathey is a third-year law student at the Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law. She graduated cum laude from the College of William & Mary in 2007. She was a CES intern from the Fall of 2008 through the Summer of 2009.  In the Fall of 2009 she became a CES scholar and the editor of “Legal Trends in Bioethics.”

 



The Center for Ethical Solutions is a non-partisan, non-profit, 501(c)(3), tax-exempt charity dedicated to educating the public on patient-care issues in medicine. The Center's financial statement (990EZ IRS annual tax filling) is available upon written request from the Center or from the Commonwealth of Virginia Office of Consumer Affairs.